Categories
Budgeting & Saving

What Should I Do With My Old 401k?

How long have you been with your employer? And how long do you plan to stay there? As a millennial, you may have a feeling of restlessness. An article from Forbes argues that job hopping is the new normal for millennials. And the most recent data released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics states that employees tend to stay with their current employer an average of 4.6 years.

If you have been with your company for a few years, you are probably thinking of that next step. It is important to continue to grow your career and stretch yourself in the process. You may decide to continue your education and go back to college or start a professional certification. Maybe you are thinking of taking some time off to travel and discover what you truly have a desire to do. It is possible that you've realized that you can support yourself with your side hustle and you are ready to become a full time entrepreneur.

Free Money

During your time with your employer you have likely contributed to the retirement plan. If your company offers a match program for retirement contributions, you likely contributed to take advantage of the free money.

Staying with your employer? Click here to watch why free money should make you dance.

Now that you are thinking of leaving, you wonder, “What happens to all of that money in my 401(k)?”

Don’t panic.

It’s your money. And you can take it with you.

And that’s where the Rollover IRA comes in.

The Rollover IRA

As an avid reader of Young Finances, you've heard of the Roth IRA and the Traditional IRA. You know that IRA stands for Individual Retirement Account and that it is a savings vehicle designed to help you save for retirement. You know that you will need to designate a beneficiary and that I have a preference when it comes to tax free money.

But I have yet to mention the Rollover IRA.

A Rollover IRA, also known as rollover, is simply a transfer of funds from a retirement account such as a 401 (k) into a Traditional or Roth IRA.

Let’s assume that you have already left your job. Starting a rollover will allow you to move assets from a 401(k) at your old employer into a brand spanking new IRA, Traditional or Roth. In essence, you would contact the administrator that holds your 401(k) and let them know that you want to rollover. They would close out your 401(k), cut you a check and you have 60 days to deposit that into an IRA account that you open.

The Rollover Tax Question

Of course, when dealing with retirement distributions, you have to consider the tax implications. Let’s see what the Internal Revenue Service has to say about it.

Will taxes be withheld from my distribution?

IRAs: IRA distributions paid to you are subject to 10% withholding unless you elect out of withholding or choose to have a different amount withheld. Withholding does not apply if the distribution is paid directly to another IRA trustee.

Retirement plans: A retirement plan distribution paid to you is subject to mandatory withholding of 20%, even if you intend to roll it over later. Withholding does not apply if you roll over the amount directly to another retirement account. A distribution sent to you in the form of a check payable to the receiving plan or IRA is not subject to withholding.

Well there you have it. Directly from Uncle Sam himself.

Tax withholding can be avoided if you roll over the distribution from a retirement plan directly to another retirement account.

You may also be thinking, why should I roll over?

Why not take the distribution, pay the tax penalty and buy a yacht to travel the world?

When you roll over a retirement plan distribution, you generally don’t have to pay tax on it until you withdraw it from the new plan. By rolling over, you are saving for your future and your money continues to grow tax-free.

If you want to allow your money to grow tax-free then a rollover may be right for you.

Ready to Rollover Your IRA?

I've discussed Betterment here at Young Finances several times. I have a Roth IRA with them and a few sub accounts dedicated to travel, long term investing and a recent investing challenge. I like them because they provide an easy way to invest with low costs. Betterment portfolios are customized based on your personal preferences and risk tolerance and they work around the clock optimizing returns at every level of risk.

It’s free to roll over 401(k) assets or an IRA to Betterment. There are no trading costs and portfolios contain cost-efficient index funds.

They make things easy.

To transfer your 401(k) assets, the direct rollover method is used which prevents any withholding or tax consequences.

Betterment also provides a rollover concierge to you and they are available to speak to your current 401(k) or IRA provider to make sure the transition of assets is completed smoothly.

Not rolling over? Open a Betterment account today and get a month free.

Something that could take days and tons of paperwork is made easy with Betterment. Instead of an overwhelming, time-consuming process, Betterment takes steps to ensure your money is put to work in an optimized portfolio as soon as possible.


Now that you know how easy it is to roll over, what job will you look for next? Or would you rather take a year to travel the world?

Originally posted 2014-10-06 06:00:58.

Categories
Investing

15 Totally Random Facts About People Who Retire With Roth IRA Money

"The best time to start thinking about your retirement is before the boss does." Anonymous

Opening and investing in a Roth IRA will allow you to have a pretty sweet nest egg of tax free money once you are ready to retire.

Now that you are a member of the Roth IRA club, you should know a few totally random facts about people who retire or plan to retire with tax free money.

1) They are much more intelligent than those around them.

15 Totally Random Facts About People Who Retire With Roth IRA Money | Young Finances

2) They have seen the movie Office Space enough times to know exactly how they envisioned their final day at work.

15 Totally Random Facts About People Who Retire With Roth IRA Money | Young Finances

3) They enjoy either beaches, skiing, or golfing.

15 Totally Random Facts About People Who Retire With Roth IRA Money | Young Finances

4) They frequently take videos of themselves relaxing by the ocean.

15 Totally Random Facts About People Who Retire With Roth IRA Money | Young Finances

5) They enjoy drinking fruity drinks by the beach.

15 Totally Random Facts About People Who Retire With Roth IRA Money | Young Finances

6) They find math interesting and may not have a TI-83 graphing calculator but they're pretty handy with a retirement calculator.

15 Totally Random Facts About People Who Retire With Roth IRA Money | Young Finances

15 Totally Random Facts About People Who Retire With Roth IRA Money | Young Finances
(Calculator Courtesy of Bloomberg)

8) They frequently ask, "what's your number?" to start up a discussion on retirement savings.

15 Totally Random Facts About People Who Retire With Roth IRA Money | Young Finances

(Courtesy of ING)

9) They secretly love/hate either Dave Ramsey, Suze Orman, or Robert Kiyosaki.

15 Totally Random Facts About People Who Retire With Roth IRA Money | Young Finances

10) They're not afraid of using travel reward credit cards to book flights around the world.

15 Totally Random Facts About People Who Retire With Roth IRA Money | Young Finances

11) They'll travel to foreign countries and stop in a new restaurant just for the free fire show.

15 Totally Random Facts About People Who Retire With Roth IRA Money | Young Finances

12) They think the Roth IRA is a retirement account that is really awesome. Fo sho!

15 Totally Random Facts About People Who Retire With Roth IRA Money | Young Finances

13) They know exactly how well balanced their portfolio is thanks to Personal Capital.

15 Totally Random Facts About People Who Retire With Roth IRA Money | Young Finances

14) They love the Roth IRA so much they're willing to put on a wig to spread the word.

15 Totally Random Facts About People Who Retire With Roth IRA Money | Young Finances

 

15) They're vigilant. They know that this list skipped the number 7. They keep an eye on every dollar. Every dollar!

15 Totally Random Facts About People Who Retire With Roth IRA Money | Young Finances

This post is a part of a special Roth IRA series. See the other posts and videos by clicking over to The Ultimate Roth IRA Guide for Young Adults.

Originally posted 2014-08-14 05:00:02.

Categories
Investing

What is a Roth IRA and Why Do I Care?

Remember that time that Trace Adkins warned that little girl not to grow up too soon?

Don't remember? Let me catch you up.

As the song begins, there's a little girl that can't wait to turn 18 and get out of her mother's house. Then the hook comes with the warning. It goes a little like this.

She was staring out that window, of that SUV
Complaining, saying I can't wait to turn 18
She said I'll make my own money, and I'll make my own rules
Mamma put the car in park out there in front of the school
Then she kissed her head and said I was just like you

You're gonna miss this
You're gonna want this back
You're gonna wish these days hadn't gone by so fast
These are some good times
So take a good look around
You may not know it now
But you're gonna miss this

I have a similar warning, but it has nothing to do with popular country music.

If you don't take the time to figure out how a Roth IRA can benefit you, you're gonnna miss this chance for tax free money.

This one financial vehicle is often quoted as the best financial tool for young adults.

What is the Roth IRA?

IRA stands for Individual Retirement Arrangement, but the lettering is often used interchangeably with Individual Retirement Account or Individual Retirement Annuity because these are the two options for opening an IRA.

The Roth IRA was set up under tax law as a way for US citizens to save for retirement with tax benefits.

With the Roth IRA you have the ability to deposit funds today that have already been taxed.

Once you reach the age of eligibility to withdraw, as long as you satisfy the requirements, you do not pay taxes on withdrawals.

You can open a Roth IRA pretty easily with a bank, broker, insurance agent, or custodian licensed to accept retirement assets.

Remember that an IRA is an individual account. It cannot be opened as a joint account.

You can contribute to a Roth IRA within the Roth IRA rules and guidelines, which is covered in part two of this series.

Opening and contributing to a Roth IRA is one of the best ways to save for retirement and grow your assets.

Now that you know how to grow your assets, you can sing about your Roth IRA's honky tonk, badonkadonk.

My Roth IRA Helps Me Grow My Assets, Honky Tonk, and Badonkadonk | Young Finances

Information courtesy of Publication 590 via the Internal Revenue Service.

This post is a part of a special Roth IRA series. See the other posts and videos by clicking over to The Ultimate Roth IRA Guide for Young Adults.

Originally posted 2014-08-11 06:00:00.